Found in the LOC: 27 Posters of Magic Acts, 1879-1929

To celebrate The Magicians’ third season premiere on SyFy tonight, I’ve magically moved up this week’s Found in the LOC: a collection of magic show posters from 1879-1929.

Here you’ll find lavish, mysterious, macabre and beguiling adverts for a bevy of oft-overlooked illusionists, including Frederick Bancroft, a Chicago dentist who moved to New York to become a magicians; Howard Thurston, a 1910 poster for whom is seen above and who would later team up with Harry Kellar, whose decapitation trick is advertised here; and there’s also Newmann the Great, the frontier-born, Minnesota-bred mentalist who helped pioneer the whole darn industry. And, yes, there’s at least one Harry Houdini-related art work (most of the Library of Congress’ images of the famous virtuoso are only available for special order or at the library itself.)

So, without further ado, here, for your entertainment, for your wonderment, for your delicious unique views… 26 posters of old school magic acts!

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Found in the LOC: 23 Great Edward Penfield Pics

Amid all those wonderful old bicycle adverts posted a few “Found in the LOCs” ago, there were a number of images by Edward Penfield, the granddaddy of American graphic design.

It seems unfair to his legacy not to offer his landmark images some more space. After all, Brooklyn-born Penfield popularized posters in the States, played a key role in establishing New Rochelle as an early arts colony  and was art director for Harper’s Weekly during a seminal period in American publishing

So here, in honor of Penfield and the path he forged for future illustrators, and in no particular order, are 23 of his illustrations, all sourced from the Library of Congress, which has a ton of other ones, too.

Some things that caught my eye: similarities between his style and two other artists, contemporary JC Leyendecker and current master Alex Katz; the self-possession of his women; and the sex appeal of his men.

(And for more Found in the LOC, click HERE.)

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Found in the L.O.C.: 5 X-Rays

 

I’m sure you’ve got this marked on your calendar, but just in case, today is the 122nd anniversary of German scientist Wilhelm Röntgen’s October 8, 1895, discovery of X-Rays. Yippee!

In honor of Röntgen life-altering, Nobel Prize-winning findings — a fluke that changed medicine forever: now doctors could see into the human body without all that messy slicing and dicing. – here are five early X-Ray-produced images found over at the L.O.C., the Library of Congress.

Image one, above, was taken in 1896 and comes with the caption, “Ein neues Licht legwet die Welt,” which translates to “a new light sets the world.”

See the rest after the jump.

And for more “Found in the L.O.C.,” click here!

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